Right Here, Right Now.

You are a precious collaboration.

Pieces, journeys, stories... 

Right Here, Right Now. 

You are full of improvisations. 

A mantra. A practise. 

Exploring. Feeling. Listening. 

Expressing. 

Feeling. 

Listening

Breathe, Right Here, Right Now. 

You are a way of being.

Making music. 

Right Here, Right Now. 

You are full of connections and connecting... 

Right Here, Right Now. 

You have captured my past; 

melodies and compositions I wrote as a teenager, 

my 1st freely improvised trumpet solo, 

my 1st conduction. Breathe. 

You are full of my intentions and un-intentions.

You are raw and fragile. 

Right Here, Right Now.

You are when my trumpet seems to play itself. 

You are as it is. 

Let it be. 

Be, be. 

Right Here, Right Now. 

Breathe.

Creative Freedom For All.  

 

Charlotte Keeffe 

Right Here, Right Now - Solo, Duo, Quartet and Large Ensemble Music

by Charlotte Keeffe, out now on Discus Music

'So many different atmospheres and structures to mindfully explore: Right Here, Right Now is just beautiful and captivating!'

bestofjazz.org

I looked forward to the compilation of Charlotte Keeffe’s own music with a quartet including guitar, double bass and drums recorded live at the Cockpit Theatre Jazz in the Round in 2019, a large ensemble, the mighty London Improvisers’ Orchestra on three tracks- quite magnificent- bees are suggested as the title implies on the tremulous first piece; the second, ‘To Steve Beresford’ a ‘conduction’ i.e. spontaneously created structures and textures, the sudden silence on 3:30 is stunning, as ‘bass’ sounds such as tuba make way for rippling piano, almost breaking into honky-tonk (!), and woodwinds, an intriguing, teasing piece with growling brass having the final say; the flutes and trumpet doing a marvellous dance, on the third, in Stravinsky territory perhaps, with a spoken mantra at the end; and one duo free improvisation with guitar (‘OM’) - ethereal harmonics and sensitive playing by Keeffe that marks her out as a top contemporary jazz musician- and a 5 minute live free improvisation. ‘Right Here, Right Now’ is the title of the Discus 107 CD. The quartet recordings are snappy, well-structured and played, four minute pieces with dreamy, lingering trumpet notes with repeated motif followed by mazy runs, mercurial guitars and flailing, swishing drums, rocking out on the second. The influence of John McLaughlin seems obvious on guitarist Moss Freed- a whole album of this please!

– Phil Jackson, ACID DRAGON

Right Here, Right Now collects together pieces by trumpet / flugelhorn player Charlotte Keeffe in various different formations – solo with electronics; in a duo with Diego Sampieri (guitar); in the Charlotte Keeffe quartet with Moss Freed (guitar), Ben Handysides (drums) and Ashley John Long (double bass). We also hear Keeffe’s work composing for the London Improvisers Orchestra on three adventurous and frequently unpredictable, playful pieces.

The result is a collection that draws out an immediacy of playing and an adaptable, varied tone. The pieces she conducted for the London Improvisers Orchestra veer from intricate, scratchy electronics, howling bells and ominous voices (‘Mysterious Breath / This One’s For The Bees…’) to the joyfully chaotic, cataclysmically euphoric nod to Orchestra stalwart and Flying Lizard par excellence Steve Beresford (‘To Steve Beresford’).

Quartet pieces like ‘Sweet, Corn’ are full of enticing energy, the interplay of the rhythm section and Keeffe’s wild, urgent playing reaching several crescendos before pivoting toward hook-y melodies and finally into squalling, beautiful noise. A more contemplative tone can be heard on the pretty ‘A Horse Named Galaxy’, even as Handysides’ drumming seems hellbent on upending the piece toward messier territory. Whether in her quartet or in a duo with Sampieri, you can hear a perfect unity between Keeffe and guitarists, leading to some genuinely breathtaking, intertwined melodic runs on the gentle, captivating ‘OM’ in particular.

Another dimension to Keeffe’s all-encompassing approach can be heard on the two solo pieces. Here we find Keeffe subjecting her trumpet and flugelhorn to a series of electronic processes, showcasing yet another side to her playing completely. ‘The Melody’s In The Post’ (inspired by a melody by Alicia Gardener-Trejo) finds her horns fading in and out over a bed of restless, itchy static that sounds like an after-hours Radiophonic Workshop for an astral jazz documentary that sadly never was. Something similar occurs on ‘Noizemaschin!!’, taken from Keeffe’s first live improvised solo set in 2017. Somewhat more restrained in its processing than ‘The Melody’s In The Post’, ‘Noizemaschin!!’ instead relies on washes of reverb and stuttering, chattering, inchoate passages interspersed with rapid note clusters, leading to a ghostly, atmospheric otherworldliness.

- Mat Smith, FURTHER.